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Gov. Newsom grants nine pardons and other reprieves 

Gov. Gavin Newsom

Gov. Gavin Newsom

–Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday announced that he has granted nine pardons, one commutation, and 10 medical reprieves.

The California Constitution gives the governor the authority to grant executive clemency in the form of a pardon, commutation, or reprieve. These clemency grants recognize the applicants’ subsequent efforts in self-development or the existence of medical exigency. They do not forgive or minimize the harm caused.

Newsom says clemency as an important part of the criminal justice system that can incentivize accountability and rehabilitation, increase public safety by removing counterproductive barriers to successful reentry, correct unjust results in the legal system and address the health needs of incarcerated people with high medical risks.

A pardon may remove counterproductive barriers to employment and public service, restore civic rights and responsibilities and prevent unjust collateral consequences of conviction, such as deportation and permanent family separation. A pardon does not expunge or erase a conviction.

A commutation modifies a sentence, making an incarcerated person eligible for an earlier release or allowing them to go before the Board of Parole Hearings for a hearing at which Parole Commissioners determine whether the individual is suitable for release.

A reprieve allows individuals classified by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as high medical risk to serve their sentences in appropriate alternative placements in the community consistent with public health and public safety.

The governor says he weighs numerous factors in his review of clemency applications, including an applicant’s self-development and conduct since the offense, whether the grant is consistent with public safety and in the interest of justice, and the impact of a grant on the community, including crime victims and survivors.

While in office, Newsom has granted a total of 72 pardons, 79 commutations, and 20 reprieves.

List of Gov. Newsom’s pardons

Jimmy Cha
On April 30, 1996, 19-year-old Mr. Cha was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, of assault with a firearm. Mr. Cha and his crime partners argued with four victims in a restaurant parking lot, then threatened them with guns and punched two of them. Mr. Cha was sentenced to five years in prison.

Josephine Edu
On March 27, 1996, Ms. Edu was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of San Bernardino, of assault with a deadly weapon. Ms. Edu got into a fight with her work supervisor and cut her with a piece of glass. She was sentenced to seven years in prison.

Alexander Galuz
On January 31, 2001, Mr. Galuz was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, of possessing a controlled substance for sale. He was sentenced to three years of probation and one year in jail.

Marco Gomez
On March 17, 1998, Mr. Gomez was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, of assault with a firearm on a person. Mr. Gomez shot and injured a victim after they argued at a street intersection. He was sentenced to five years in prison. Mr. Gomez was 19 years old at the time of the crime.

Steven Husong
Mr. Husong has submitted to this office a formal application for executive clemency in the form of a gubernatorial pardon. He has provided evidence that he is living an upright life and has demonstrated his fitness for the restoration of civic rights and responsibilities.

Robert Hutton
On October 31, 1985, Mr. Hutton was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, of possessing a controlled substance for sale. He was sentenced to 4 years of probation and 90 days in jail.

Ian Jerde
On June 29, 1993, 19-year-old Mr. Jerde was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, of conspiracy to commit a crime. He was sentenced to three years of probation and one year in jail.

Robert Thies
On February 25, 1988, Mr. Thies was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Kern, of manufacturing, transporting, and possession a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance for sale, and conspiracy to commit a crime and obstruct justice. He was sentenced to l0 years in prison.

Paul Williams
On November 17, 1987, Mr. Williams was convicted in the Superior Court of California, County of Contra Costa, of transporting or selling a controlled substance. He was sentenced to 3 years of probation and 150 days in jail.

The governor’s office encourages victims, survivors, and witnesses to register with CDCR’s Office of Victims and Survivors Rights and Services to receive information about an incarcerated person’s status or call 1-877-256-6877.

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